MYANMAR
CULTURE AND HISTORY
TRAVEL TIPS
YANGON CITY
MANDALAY
BAGAN
KYAIKHTIYO
MRAUKU
INLE LAKE
 
MM-01 YANGON STOPOVER

3 Days / 2 Nights Yagon Stopover, sight seeing in Yangon including Shwedagon Pagoda 114.- USD
MM-02 GLIMPSE OF MYANMAR


5 Days / 4 Nights visit Yangon - Bagan, visit plain of pagodas and Mount Popa 453.- USD

MM-03 MYANMAR AT A GLANCE


6 Days / 5 Nights this perfect package to Myanmar visit all most of the main tourist attractions 660.- USD

MM-04 MYANMAR CLASSIC


7 Days / 6 nights completely to visit the golden land of Myanmar 704.- USD

MM-05 EXPLORING MYANMAR


7 Days / 6 nights package to explore nature and culture with cruise along Irawadee River
592.- USD

MM-06 MYANMAR DELIGHT


5 Days / 4 nights package to the main city of Myanmar 624.- USD

 
Bagan City

Bagan CityBagan, the City of four million Pagodas is a small town 190 Km due south of Mandalay. It is situated on the eastern bank of Majestic Ayeyawaddy (Irrawaddy) River, and the single place to see more than 2200 religious edifices within the area of 48 Sq-Km. Actually the Lord Buddha, whose personal name Sidaratha was born in India and enlightened there, but Buddhism is still flourishing in Myanmar until now. Bagan can be said the birthplace of Myanmar Culture, and the center of Buddhist learning. The inhabitants in and around are real Burmans whose live is very simple, probably primitive compare to outside world.

MYNMAR BY DESTINATIONS

LOCATION
The town of Bagan (formerly spelled as "Pagan"), central Myanmar (Burma), situated on the left bank of the Irrawaddy River and approximately 90 miles (145 km) southwest of Mandalay. The site of an old capital city of Myanmar, Pagan is a pilgrimage centre and contains ancient Buddhist shrines that have been restored and redecorated and are in current use. Ruins of other shrines and pagodas cover a wide area. An earthquake on July 8, 1975, severely damaged more than half of the important structures and irreparably destroyed many of them. The whole of the Buphaya Pagoda, for nine centuries a landmark for river-boatmen, tumbled into the Irrawaddy and was carried off by the waters. The village also has a school for lacquerware, for which the region is noted.

HISTORY
Pagan's importance lies in its heritage rather than its present. In 849 Burmans found the town of Bagan on the banks of the Ayeyarwaddy about 500 kilometers north of its mouth. Bagan was to be the center of the first Burmese realm about which a wealth of historical information exists. Although even before then in the Ayeyarwaddy valley realms with urban centers had existed, there are only scarce historical sources concerning those earlier realms. Before the Burmans the people of the Mon, related to the Cambodians, and before them the Tibeto-Burman people of the Pyu had founded realms in the Ayeyarwaddy valley or delta, but were in the course of time conquered by the Bagan Burmans. . In 1287 it was over run by the Mongols during their wide-ranging conquests, and it never recovered its position, though a little desultory building continued on Buddhist shrines. 
OLD BAGAN
Old Pagan was a walled city, its western flank resting on the Irrawaddy River. It was the focus of a network of high roads by means of which its rulers could command a large region of fertile plains and could dominate other major Myanmar dynastic cities, such as Pegu(Bago). From the port of Thiripyissaya, further down the river, important overseas trade was conducted with India, Ceylon, and other regions of Southeast Asia. The walls of the old city, within which lies a substantial area of the modern town, probably originally contained only royal, aristocratic, religious, and administrative buildings. The populace is thought to have lived outside in homes of light construction closely resembling those occupied by the present-day inhabitants. The walled city, whose moats were fed by the Irrawaddy, was thus a sacred dynastic fortress. The circuit of its walls and river frontage is some 2.5 miles (4 km), and there is evidence that perhaps as much as the river has washed a third of the old city away. Because building was principally in brick, decoration was carried out in carved brick, in stucco, and in terra-cotta. The earliest surviving structure is probably the 10th-century Nat Hlaung Gyaung. The shrines that stand by the Sarabha Gate in the eastern wall, although later than the wall they adjoin, are also early. These are shrines of protecting nats--the traditional spirit deities of the animist ethnic Burmans.